industrial sales

How PR and SEO work together

It seems reasonable to consider that the first responsibility of a marketing executive is to understand the market in which they operate. One area that is easily overlooked is terminology – what do people call your product?

This is especially important if for example you have a non-UK head office who insists on a global generic product name that while it makes sense is actually never used in the U.K.

Google does not know that this global generic is also known by a swath of maybe 10 more commonly used industrial jargon names. So unless you as a marketer put those jargon names into your website, your SEO and your publicity – you will simply not be found online by the great majority of searchers who call your product something completely different.

For example, as a manufacturer of “car locks” if you want to be found for “vehicle security systems” you need to be explicit. Google will not know (as we do) that a “car lock” is a “vehicle security system” or part of one.

It may however conflate the words “vehicle”, “security” and “systems” from different parts of your text, but will generally list these below someone else who uses the phrase “vehicle security systems”.

Having done this “jargon SEO” then monitor your web presence and traffic for these new keywords – especially in your long tail search strings. Equally of course, if you insist on calling your product something “corporate” that no-one else has heard of, then you are unlikely to get many searches for it until you have put a lot of money into promoting your new name/brand, along with all its synonyms, although you will come top of page 1 if it is actually unique – even if no one is looking for it.

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Marketing is all about perspective

When I took on my first proper marketing job (as marketing manager for a small company in the enclosures business) I was given a sales territory of my own – it was local and smaller than the other sales engineers but I was accountable for it and had to spend time “on the road”. I was also introduced to the sales desk – where I spent many happy hours!

My point is that we should not forget what it is to be a customer and to deal with customers face to face. It requires empathy – that ability to walk a few yards in someone else’s shoes. This is a process that can yield remarkable outcomes as sometimes taking a slightly different view of a situation can yield a completely different understanding – whether it is marketing or engineering.

If you don’t understand a marketing activity or an application then put yourself in your customers’ shoes and see what they see – often it really is all about perspective.

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We are here to help - number 3

Finally, the third in our series on the importance of how a company does things – Don’t leave your customers with a problem.

If you go to an expert you expect them to sort your problem, yes? Not to find the Holy Grail but to at least try and if they know they can’t do it, then to be delighted to suggest an alternative.

Well, in industry and especially manufacturing, every company is expected to be an expert – so act responsibly – don’t just off-handedly explain “Oh no, we can’t deal with that” and leave your customer hanging, lost and unsupported to find their way in a situation where they are unable on their own to resolve the matter. If you really can’t (or don’t want to) help directly then a sympathetic referral or possible direction to explore will be warmly remembered – rather than a grumpy refusal.

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We are here to help - number 2

Welcome to the second in our series on the importance of how a company does things. Selling what you believe in – and not – that is not believing in it and not selling it.

There is a myth abroad that a “salesman”/”saleswoman” can sell anything (as if that was a good thing!). The truth is that someone who believes in a product or service as being right for the customer, backed by experience and expertise is probably the best sales person you have. In the mass market business to customer (B2C) world where repeat sales are maybe not as important, the sell anything-to-anyone approach with pressure tactics if necessary is a common finding. However, in the business to business (B2B) world where numbers are smaller and technical considerations fully front and centre, then it simply puts people off. If your sales people know what they are doing and believe in it then it shines through to a fundamentally better customer experience.

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